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A Mother’s experience in teaching her child to read with Minecraft

I have known about the power of Minecraft for a while. It has opened up a whole new world for my son, and has been a real boost to his ability to socialise as he has bonded with like minded people over the game. Here a mother shares her experience with teaching her son with Asperger’s to read and write using Minecraft:

http://www.stam.se/blog/2013/01/05/how-minecraft-taught-my-9-year-old-son-with-aspergers-to-read-and-write/

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No More Meltdowns: Positive Strategies for Managing and Preventing Out-of-control Behavior

It could happen at the grocery store. At a restaurant. At school. At home. Meltdowns are stressful for both child and adult, but Dr. Baker can help! His 20+ years of experience have yielded time-tested strategies, and amazing results. An easy-to-follow, four-step model will improve your everyday relationships with the children in your life: Managing your own emotions by adjusting your expectations, Learning strategies to calm a meltdown in the moment, Understanding why a meltdown occurs, and Creating plans to prevent future meltdowns.

via No More Meltdowns: Positive Strategies for Managing and Preventing Out-of-control Behavior.

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The New Social Story Book

Carol Gray’s “Social Stories[trademark]” are not only familiar throughout the autism community, but they have become an absolute necessity for parents and educators. Carol Gray pioneered this method of teaching social skills through structured stories and her method is now a standard in special needs education. With the exponential growth of children being diagnosed with autism (and the number of adults who support them), the need for this book is increasing by the minute. Now, with a revamped format and over 50 per cent more stories, this classic will reenter the market with a bang. Since the early 90s, Carol Gray’s world-famous “Social Stories[trademark]” have helped thousands of children with autism spectrum disorders. This 10th Anniversary edition of her best-selling book offers the ready-to-use stories that parents and educators have depended on for years, but now features over 25 additional “Social Stories”, groundbreaking new strategies for creating custom stories, and a modern design complete with full-color photos. Developed through years of experience, these strategically written stories explain social situations in a way children with autism understand, while teaching the social skills children need to be successful at home, at school, and in the community.

via The New Social Story Book.

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How Do I Teach This Kid to Read?: Teaching Literacy Skills to Young Children with Autism, from Phonics to Reading Comprehension

Award-winning author of the How Do I Teach This Kid series, Kim Henry extends her expertise to the realm of reading. In this book, she presents simple instructional strategies for developing early literacy skills in young children with autism. She provides evidence-based research to support her strategies and addresses topics such as phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension. Included are creative activities and interesting lesson plans that can be easily adapted or combined with other teaching methods to suit teachers’ and students’ individual needs. A bonus CD of printable lesson plans is also included!

via How Do I Teach This Kid to Read?: Teaching Literacy Skills to Young Children with Autism, from Phonics to Reading Comprehension.

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Tips for helping children with Auditory Processing Disorder

Reposted from kidshealth.org

“Strategies applied at home and school can ease some of the problem behaviors associated with APD. Because it’s common for kids with CAPD to have difficulty following directions, for example, these tactics might help: Continue reading

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Auditory Processing Disorder

A child with Auditory Processing Disorder may appear not to hear parts of a conversation or remember instructions, or they may seem to be ignoring someone talking, even if they are close by. They may appear deaf – but this is nothing to do with hearing, and the child may indeed have normal, or even more sensitive than normal, hearing. Difficulties with auditory processing stem from a malfunction in the transfer of audio signals from the ear to the brain. Continue reading